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Article Dans Une Revue Nature Communications Année : 2022

Giant switchable non thermally-activated conduction in 180° domain walls in tetragonal Pb(Zr,Ti)O3

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Felix Risch
Yuri Tikhonov
  • Fonction : Auteur
Igor Stolichnov

Résumé

Abstract Conductive domain walls in ferroelectrics offer a promising concept of nanoelectronic circuits with 2D domain-wall channels playing roles of memristors or synoptic interconnections. However, domain wall conduction remains challenging to control and pA-range currents typically measured on individual walls are too low for single-channel devices. Charged domain walls show higher conductivity, but are generally unstable and difficult to create. Here, we show highly conductive and stable channels on ubiquitous 180° domain walls in the archetypical ferroelectric, tetragonal Pb(Zr,Ti)O 3 . These electrically erasable/rewritable channels show currents of tens of nanoamperes (200 to 400 nA/μm) at voltages ≤2 V and metallic-like non thermally-activated transport properties down to 4 K, as confirmed by nanoscopic mapping. The domain structure analysis and phase-field simulations reveal complex switching dynamics, in which the extraordinary conductivity in strained Pb(Zr,Ti)O 3 films is explained by an interplay between ferroelastic a- and c-domains. This work demonstrates the potential of accessible and stable arrangements of nominally uncharged and electrically switchable domain walls for nanoelectronics.

Dates et versions

hal-03881438 , version 1 (01-12-2022)

Identifiants

Citer

Felix Risch, Yuri Tikhonov, Igor Lukyanchuk, Adrian Ionescu, Igor Stolichnov. Giant switchable non thermally-activated conduction in 180° domain walls in tetragonal Pb(Zr,Ti)O3. Nature Communications, 2022, 13 (1), pp.7239. ⟨10.1038/s41467-022-34777-6⟩. ⟨hal-03881438⟩
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