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Article Dans Une Revue Journal of Nephrology Année : 2022

Use of a hospital administrative database to identify and characterize community-acquired, hospital-acquired and drug-induced acute kidney injury

Résumé

Background: Acute kidney injury (AKI) has serious short- and long-term consequences. The objective of the present study of a cohort of hospitalized patients with AKI was to (i) evaluate the proportion of patients with hospital-acquired (HA) AKI and community-acquired (CA) AKI, the characteristics of these patients and the AKIs, and the short-term outcomes, and (ii) determine the performance of several ICD-10 codes for identifying AKI (both CA and HA) and drug-induced AKI. Methods: A cohort of hospitalized patients with AKI was constituted by screening hospital's electronic medical records (EMRs) for cases of AKI. We distinguished between and compared CA-AKI and HA-AKI and evaluated the proportion of AKIs that were drug-induced. The EMR data were merged with hospital billing codes (according to the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Edition (ICD-10)) for each hospital stay. The ability of ICD-10 codes to identify AKIs (depending on the type of injury) was determined by calculating the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV). Lastly, we sought to validate specific ICD-10 codes for drug-induced AKI. Results: Of the 2473 patients included, 1557 experienced an AKI (HA-AKI: 59.3%; CA-AKI: 40.7%). Patients with CA-AKI had a better short-term outcome and a lower death rate (7.6%, vs. 20% for HA-AKI). One AKI in three was drug-induced. The combination of AKI codes had a very high specificity (94.8%), a high PPV (94.9%), a moderate NPV (56.7%) and moderate sensitivity (57.4%). The sensitivity was higher for CA-AKI (72.2%, vs. 47.2% for HA-AKI), for more severe AKI (82.8% for grade 3 AKI vs. 43.7% for grade 1 AKI), and for patients with CKD. Use of a specific ICD-10 code for drug-induced AKI (N14x) alone gave a very low sensitivity (1.8%), whereas combining codes for adverse drug reactions with AKI-specific codes increased the sensitivity. Conclusion: Our results show that the combination of an EMR-based analysis with ICD-10-based hospital billing codes gives a comprehensive "real-life" picture of AKI in hospital settings. We expect that this approach will enable researchers to study AKI in more depth.
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Dates et versions

hal-03819929 , version 1 (18-10-2022)

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Amayelle Rey, Valérie Gras-Champel, Thibaut Balcaen, Gabriel Choukroun, Kamel Masmoudi, et al.. Use of a hospital administrative database to identify and characterize community-acquired, hospital-acquired and drug-induced acute kidney injury. Journal of Nephrology, 2022, 35 (3), pp.955-968. ⟨10.1007/s40620-021-01174-z⟩. ⟨hal-03819929⟩

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