Younger trees in the upper canopy are more sensitive but also more resilient to drought - Archive ouverte HAL Accéder directement au contenu
Article Dans Une Revue Nature Climate Change Année : 2022

Younger trees in the upper canopy are more sensitive but also more resilient to drought

, , , , , (1) , , , (2) , , (3)
1
2
3
Tsun Fung Au
Justin Maxwell
Scott Robeson
Jinbao Li
Sacha Siani
Kimberly Novick
Matthew Dannenberg
Richard Phillips
Teng Li
Zhenju Chen
  • Fonction : Auteur

Résumé

As forest demographics are altered by the global decline of old trees and reforestation efforts, younger trees are expected to have an increasingly important influence on carbon sequestration and forest ecosystem functioning. However, the relative resilience of these younger trees to climate change stressors is poorly understood. Here we examine age-dependent drought sensitivity of over 20,000 individual trees across five continents and show that younger trees in the upper canopy layer have larger growth reductions during drought. Angiosperms show greater age differences than gymnosperms, and age-dependent sensitivity is more pronounced in humid climates compared with more arid regions. However, younger canopy-dominant trees also recover more quickly from drought. The future combination of increased drought events and an increased proportion of younger canopy-dominant trees suggests a larger adverse impact on carbon stocks in the short term, while the higher resilience of younger canopy-dominant trees could positively affect carbon stocks over time.
Fichier non déposé

Dates et versions

hal-03928624 , version 1 (07-01-2023)

Identifiants

Citer

Tsun Fung Au, Justin Maxwell, Scott Robeson, Jinbao Li, Sacha Siani, et al.. Younger trees in the upper canopy are more sensitive but also more resilient to drought. Nature Climate Change, 2022, 12 (12), pp.1168-1174. ⟨10.1038/s41558-022-01528-w⟩. ⟨hal-03928624⟩
0 Consultations
0 Téléchargements

Altmetric

Partager

Gmail Facebook Twitter LinkedIn More